project ‘micro targeting’

Home/Tag: project 'micro targeting'

Digital Democracy: Threats & (Design) Opportunities (Seminar)

2018-11-22T16:34:29+01:00November 18th, 2018|Tags: , , |

This event, jointly organized by the Brookings Institute and Delft University of Technology, explores the weakness and dangers the digital environment poses to democracy, and investigates how the digital environment might be proactively redesigned in order to positively enhance the quality democracy.

Digital Democracy: Threats and (Design) Opportunities – Seminar on 29 November

2018-11-20T12:29:59+01:00November 18th, 2018|Categories: Event announcement|Tags: , , |

On 29 November 2018 the Brookings Institute and Delft University of Technology are together organizing a seminar that explores the weakness and dangers the digital environment poses to democracy, and investigates how the digital environment might be proactively redesigned in order to positively enhance the quality democracy. Registration is still possible until 27 November.

How to Win Elections in the 21st Century… and How to Save Democracy

2019-01-23T15:51:24+01:00November 12th, 2018|Categories: Blog by Jeroen van den Hoven, DDfV Blogs|Tags: , , , |

According to the American Pragmatist philosopher John Dewey we have to reinvent democracy every day anew… and now, in the age of big data and artificial intelligence, in addition we have to design for it, every day. If we cannot design against undemocratic tendencies and technically implement our democratic ideals and ideas, Jeroen van den Hoven and Haye Hazenberg argue, we risk losing them altogether.

TU Delft Investigates the Influence of Digitization on Democracy

2019-01-23T15:45:33+01:00October 21st, 2018|Categories: Research updates|Tags: , , |

In the run-up to the Dutch municipal elections of 2018, a team of researchers from Delft University of Technology investigated the influence of digitization on Dutch parliamentary democracy. Aspects investigated included the role of political micro-targeting, 'bots' and algorithms, and the political debate on Twitter. This research was made possible by a subsidy from the parliamentary state committee